History of Canada

History of Canada

Canadian History

Mysteries of Canada was started in 1998 as a project to help Canadians better understand the history, geography, myths and legends of their own country.  The site has grown over the years into a major site attracting visitors from all across Canada and the rest of the world.  The site is used by 50+ schools across the country to help teach language, writing and history.  It is used internationally as a language training asset.  Certain stories and images from this site have been used in newspapers, TV, history books and other media.

Welcome to Mysteries of Canada.  Poke around a bit, read a bit, maybe even submit an article or two and, most of all, have some fun and learn. 

Latest Articles

Fort Walsh and the Cypress Hills Massacre

  What's the first thing that comes to mind when you think of Canada? For many people, the answer to that question is one of five things: 1) maple syrup; 2) beavers; 3) hockey; 4) beer; and 5) Mounties. Of those five things, only Mounties- formally known as the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, or RCMP- are unique to the Great White North. The Royal Canadian Mounted Police of today- with the exception of those guarding Parliament Hill in Ottawa who, at least according to the Arrogant Worms, "just sit on [their horses] and tell American tourists the parliament's in session"- have long since exchanged the iconic campaign hat
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The History of Albertan Oil and Gas

The Texas of Canada? Alberta has often been called 'The Texas of Canada', and with good reason; like its American counterpart, so-called 'Wild Rose Country' has traditionally been a bastion of cowboy culture, conservative values, and perhaps most importantly, the oil and gas industry. For as long as its been a province, 'The Texas of Canada' has been a favorite place for ranchers to set up shop, and for as long as it's had ranchers, Alberta has had a strong cowboy culture. The province boasts the Raymond and Medicine Hat Stampedes, two of the oldest rodeos in the world, as well as the world-famous Calgary Stampede. Calgary itself,
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Klondike Gold Rush – Part 6: Dawson City

By autumn 1897, the Klondike Gold Rush was in full swing. Throughout the fall of 1897 and the winter and spring of 1898, thousands of Stampeders (as Klondike gold seekers were known) converged on Dawson City and the Klondike from many different directions. Some took the so-called "Rich Man's Route", travelling by steamer to St. Michael, Alaska, on the Bering Sea, then up the Yukon River to Dawson City. Others took the perilous all-American routes over crevasse-ridden glaciers, or the grueling all-Canadian route over thousands of miles of sub-arctic swamp. Many more traveled by steamer up the Lynn Canal to
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Klondike Gold Rush- Part 5: Dawson Trails

In the summer of 1897, the steamboats Excelsior and Portland arrived in San Francisco and Seattle, respectively, bringing news of the Klondike Gold Rush to the Outside world. The news spread like wildfire throughout the west coast. Almost immediately, thousands of would-be prospectors from all walks of life quit their jobs, outfitted themselves with provisions and equipment, and purchased steamship tickets north, bound for Dawson City. This mass exodus was known as the Klondike Stampede. The Dawson Trails Participants in the Stampede of 1897/98 were known as Stampeders. Throughout the autumn of 1897 and the winter of '97/'98, Stampeders converged on Dawson City,
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Klondike Gold Rush- Part 4: The Stampede

In the summer of 1896, gold was discovered in the Klondike region of what is now Canada's Yukon territory. When word of the find spread up and down the Yukon River, prospectors from all over the Canadian and American north abandoned their shacks for the new diggings. As was typical of northern Canadian gold rushes, a boom town sprouted almost overnight a short distance from the goldfields. This ramshackle community, situated at the confluence of the Klondike and Yukon Rivers, would become the famous Dawson City. Throughout the following fall and winter, prospectors staked claims along the Klondike creeks and sunk shafts
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