History of Canada

History of Canada

Canadian History

Mysteries of Canada was started in 1998 as a project to help Canadians better understand the history, geography, myths and legends of their own country.  The site has grown over the years into a major site attracting visitors from all across Canada and the rest of the world.  The site is used by 50+ schools across the country to help teach language, writing and history.  It is used internationally as a language training asset.  Certain stories and images from this site have been used in newspapers, TV, history books and other media.

Welcome to Mysteries of Canada.  Poke around a bit, read a bit, maybe even submit an article or two and, most of all, have some fun and learn. 

Latest Articles

The Treasure of Shellbird Island

The Treasure of Shellbird Island Yes, b’y, there are few places in Canada richer in local folklore than the eastern shores of Newfoundland. The town of Torbay, for example, on the east coast of the Avalon Peninsula, is said to be haunted by a stygian hellhound with glowing red eyes- a Maritime counterpart to the legendary ‘black dog’ of the British Isles. Bell Island, in Conception Bay, is believed by some to be home to a phantom hag, a haunted mine, and a band of malevolent faeries. And St. John’s Harbour, according to the journal of 16th/17th Century English colonist Sir

The Cursed Lighthouse of Bird Rock

The Cursed Lighthouse of Bird Rock Every day, freighters passing through the Cabot Strait- the waterway between Newfoundland and Cape Breton, which separates the Gulf of St. Lawrence from the greater Atlantic Ocean- float by a bleak, windswept isle known as Rocher aux Oiseaux, or Bird Rock. This five-acre islet is an outlying member of the Magdalen Islands, a hook-shaped archipelago in the Gulf of St. Lawrence which, despite being closer to Newfoundland, Nova Scotia, and Prince Edward Island, actually belongs to the province of Quebec.In the summer, Bird Rock- along with its northwesterly sister, a nearby cluster of sea rocks
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The Little Green Men of Steep Rock Lake

The Little Green Men of Steep Rock Lake Near the southern border of Northwestern Ontario, about three kilometres northwest of the tiny town of Atikokan, lies a body of water known as Steep Rock Lake. In 1950, this remote woodland retreat, nestled in the heart of what locals proudly refer to as the “Canoeing Capital of Canada”, was the setting of a bizarre story that has intrigued ufologists (as students of the UFO phenomenon are known) for nearly seventy years.The Town of Steep Rock Back in 1938, an Ontario prospector named Julian Cross discovered that Steep Rock Lake lay atop a rich
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Captain Voss and the Voyage of the Tilikum

Captain Voss and the Voyage of the Tilikum “Tilikum” is the Chinook Jargon word for “friend” (Chinook Jargon being a pidgin trade language of the Pacific Northwest). Many people most readily associate this word with “Tilly”, the late, controversial, man-eating captive orca which once performed tricks at Seaworld Orlando and Victoria’s now-defunct Sealand of the Pacific.Many people might be surprised to learn that the Victoria, British Columbia, is also associated with another extraordinary seagoing “Tilikum”- a 150-year-old Nootkan dugout canoe which made an incredible 40,000 mile journey across the Pacific, Indian, and Atlantic Oceans in the early 1900s, piloted by the

How Canada Saved the Buffalo

How Canada Saved the Buffalo No doot aboot it: we Canadians love our wildlife, and we’re not afraid to show it. Visitors to our country are greeted by images of moose, blue whales, and Canada geese when they step off the plane, and the polar bear, the elk, and the beaver- animals as quintessentially Canadian as ice hockey and maple syrup- keep Her Majesty company on our toonies, quarters, and nickels.Considering our national affinity for the denizens of our great outdoors, many Canucks would be pleased to learn that Canada played a major role in one of the greatest conservation success