History of Canada

History of Canada

Canadian History

Mysteries of Canada was started in 1998 as a project to help Canadians better understand the history, geography, myths and legends of their own country.  The site has grown over the years into a major site attracting visitors from all across Canada and the rest of the world.  The site is used by 50+ schools across the country to help teach language, writing and history.  It is used internationally as a language training asset.  Certain stories and images from this site have been used in newspapers, TV, history books and other media.

Welcome to Mysteries of Canada.  Poke around a bit, read a bit, maybe even submit an article or two and, most of all, have some fun and learn. 

Latest Articles

The Dream that Solved a Murder

The Dream that Solved a Murder Canadian frontier lore is littered with strange tales of clairvoyance. In these stories, certain gifted people supposedly become aware of distant events through visions or dreams. More often than not, the gifted characters in these stories are of aboriginal (often Dene) descent.One such tale to come out of Grande Prairie Country in Northwest Alberta, for example, tells of a strange dream had by a Beaver Indian woman in the summer of 1945. In her dream, the ghost of her dead husband led her to the bodies of two fellow tribesmen who drowned in the Wapiti
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Clairvoyance on the Canadian Frontier

Exactly 73 years ago, on June 11, 1945, two Indian trappers drowned in the headwaters of the Wapiti River in the British Columbian Rockies somewhere between Prince George, BC, and Grande Prairie, Alberta. These men, named Archie Belcourt and Josie LeTan, hailed from the tiny community of Rio Grande, located about 95 kilometres to the northeast. Tasked with guiding a survey party, they attempted to cross the Wapiti on horseback and were swept from their mounts by the spring current. Although the survey party searched for their remains, no trace of their bodies could be found.The Dream About a month later,

The Strange Death of Violet Goglin

The Strange Death of Violet Goglin Last Christmas, the Season 4 premiere of the Canadian TV series Letterkenny aired on CraveTV. This hilarious sitcom revolves around the small fictional town of Letterkenny, situated in the heart of rural Ontario. Each episode details the exploits of the members of the town’s four main sub-cultures: the hicks, the hockey players, the skids, and the Christians. From the standoffish, tough-guy attitudes of the farm kids to the almost-incomprehensible vernacular of the junior hockey boys, Letterkenny is filled with side-splitting inside jokes which will resonate anyone familiar with small-town Canadian culture.According to an article by
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Thunderbird- A Canadian Legend

Thunderbird A Canadian Legend On the eastern shore of Stanley Park in Vancouver, British Columbia, at a place known as Brockton Point, stands a cluster of ten totem poles carved and painted by First Nations artists. One of these carvings- a striking replica of a Kwakwaka'wakw longhouse post- stands in conspicuous prominence. It is called the 'Thunderbird House Post.'The lower half of the Thunderbird House Post features a grizzly bear holding a human being. Its upper half- the half relevant to this article- is dominated by an aquiline figure with outstretched wings- a mysterious character from First Nations mythology known as the Thunderbird.The

Waheela- the Great White Wolf of Northern Canada

Waheela The Great White Wolf of Northern Canada On May 16, 2018, a Montanan rancher shot and killed a strange wolf-like creature on his property. According to Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks (FWP) officials:“The animal came within several hundred yards of the rancher’s livestock. He shot it and reported it as required by law. The animal was a young, non-lactating female and a canid, a member of the dog family, which includes dogs, foxes, coyotes and wolves…“The animal originally was reported as a wolf, but several Fish, Wildlife and Parks’ wolf specialists looked at photos of the animal and collectively doubted it