History of Canada

History of Canada

Canadian History

Mysteries of Canada was started in 1998 as a project to help Canadians better understand the history, geography, myths and legends of their own country.  The site has grown over the years into a major site attracting visitors from all across Canada and the rest of the world.  The site is used by 50+ schools across the country to help teach language, writing and history.  It is used internationally as a language training asset.  Certain stories and images from this site have been used in newspapers, TV, history books and other media.

Welcome to Mysteries of Canada.  Poke around a bit, read a bit, maybe even submit an article or two and, most of all, have some fun and learn. 

Latest Articles

Nakani: The Wildman of the North

Deep in the wilderness of Northern Canada lies a mysterious region around which strange tales have swirled for more than 100 years. Located near the junction of British Columbia, Yukon, and the Northwest Territories, the Nahanni Valley is region replete with stories of headless prospectors, hidden gold mines, tropical oases, lost tribes, evil spirits, Indian curses, prehistoric monsters, and a mysterious “White Queen”. For about a year now, the legends of the Nahanni have enjoyed a resurgence in popularity. They have been mentioned in many different YouTube videos and podcasts. A group of filmmakers from Calgary, Alberta, are currently in

Governor General Visits Northwest

Back to The Riders of the Plains.The following is an excerpt from The Riders of the Plains: A Reminiscence of the Early and Exciting Days in the North West (1905), by Cecil Edward Denny. This work is in the public domain.Continued from Chapter XXIV – Indian Farm Started.  Chapter XXV Governor General Visits NorthwestTHE COMMISSIONER of the Police was notified from Ottawa during the summer of 1881, by the Comptroller of the force, Mr. F. White, that it was the intention of the Marquis of Lorne, the Governor General of Canada, to visit the North-west Territories during that summer, and to have escorts of police in

Indian Farm Started

Back to The Riders of the Plains.The following is an excerpt from The Riders of the Plains: A Reminiscence of the Early and Exciting Days in the North West (1905), by Cecil Edward Denny. This work is in the public domain.Continued from Chapter XXIII – Trouble with the Indians at Calgary.  Chapter XXIV Indian Farm StartedIN NOVEMBER 1880 Col. Macleod, the commissioner of the police, resigned that position, and the Assistant-Commissioner, Lt.-Col. Irvine, was appointed in his place, the headquarters of the force still being at Fort Walsh. Col. Macleod was appointed stipendiary magistrate for the Northwest Territories, his district being a very large one, comprising
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Trouble with the Indians at Calgary

Back to The Riders of the Plains.The following is an excerpt from The Riders of the Plains: A Reminiscence of the Early and Exciting Days in the North West (1905), by Cecil Edward Denny. This work is in the public domain.Continued from Chapter XXII – After a Murderer.  Chapter XXIII Trouble with the Indians at Calgary SHORTLY AFTER MY arrival at Fort Walsh, I obtained two months’ leave, to return to Fort Calgary, at which place I intended to take up a ranche on the bottom where the present town is now built, and I wished to make arrangements with an ex-policeman, an old servant of mine,
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After a Murderer

Back to The Riders of the Plains.The following is an excerpt from The Riders of the Plains: A Reminiscence of the Early and Exciting Days in the North West (1905), by Cecil Edward Denny. This work is in the public domain.Continued from Chapter XXI – Famine Among the Blackfeet.  Chapter XXII After a Murderer WE RECEIVED WORD during the winter of 1879 at Fort Walsh that the Indian, Star Child, on whom suspicion rested as having been the murderer of Greybourn, was in an Indian camp south of Fort Benton, Montana, and Major Crozier who was in command of Fort Walsh that winter, instructed me in the
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