History of Canada

History of Canada

Canadian History

Mysteries of Canada was started in 1998 as a project to help Canadians better understand the history, geography, myths and legends of their own country.  The site has grown over the years into a major site attracting visitors from all across Canada and the rest of the world.  The site is used by 50+ schools across the country to help teach language, writing and history.  It is used internationally as a language training asset.  Certain stories and images from this site have been used in newspapers, TV, history books and other media.

Welcome to Mysteries of Canada.  Poke around a bit, read a bit, maybe even submit an article or two and, most of all, have some fun and learn. 

Latest Articles

Joe Tanner’s Daring

The following is an excerpt from Indian Tales of the Canadian Prairies (1894) by James F. Sanderson. Joe Tanner's Daring One of the bravest leaders among the Indians that I ever knew was Kay-siss-a-way, meaning He Moves Quick. His Christian name was Joseph Tanner, his grandfather being an Englishman of that name. He was, on the grandmother’s side, of Red Lake Chippewa Indian blood and, in addition to his reputation for bravery, he was accounted one of the shrewdest as well as the most honest of the red men with whom the whites had to deal. He was employed for some years
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Iron Shield’s Fall

The following is an excerpt from Indian Tales of the Canadian Prairies (1894) by James F. Sanderson. Iron Shield's Fall One of the most gallant and successful stands ever made by a band of Indian warriors against overwhelming numbers, was made by five Cree braves, a little over twenty years ago, on an island in the Saskatchewan about half a mile below Medicine Hat, and a little above the point where Seven Persons Creek joins the river.Two of the band were Crees and the other three were Oos-kus-chee-moos-suks, or Young Dogs, as they were called, a cross between Crees and Assiniboines. The
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O-kish-che-ta-wak

The following is an excerpt from Indian Tales of the Canadian Prairies by James Francis Sanderson. O-kish-che-ta-wak There was a large band of Blackfoot encamped on the plain of Medicine Hat. This was a favored resort of the Blackfoot in the spring and summer and, at the time I speak of, the whole district was claimed by them as a part of their territory.The chief in command of the band was known as Wa-push-ka-pim-bach-tat, or Running Rabbit, and, as usual with Indians, they had quite a number of ponies with them. These they turned loose on the hillside above Bull Head (now
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How Seven Persons Creek was Named

The following is an excerpt from Indian Tales of the Canadian Prairies (1894) by James F. Sanderson. How Seven Persons Creek was Named Long, long ago- it would be useless to attempt to find out how many years ago- a party of Blackfoot when out on the war path, had occasion to cross a creek a little way above its junction with the South Saskatchewan. On the banks they found the dead bodies of seven men lying just as if they had been suddenly struck down when following each other in Indian file. Although it was evident that they had been dead
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How Medicine Hat was Named

The following is an excerpt from Indian Tales of the Canadian Prairies (1894) by James Francis Sanderson. How Medicine Hat was Named There is a certain part of the South Saskatchewan River about a mile and a half from Medicine Hat, on which, even during the most severe winters, no ice forms. This opening in the river is regarded with great interest by the Indians, as it is believed to be the breathing place of the Great Spirit who lives in the river and who, when he shows himself, assumes the form of a serpent. As an indication of the widespread interest
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