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Joe Tanner’s Daring

The following is an excerpt from Indian Tales of the Canadian Prairies (1894) by James F. Sanderson. Joe Tanner's Daring One of the bravest leaders among the Indians that I ever knew was Kay-siss-a-way, meaning He Moves Quick. His Christian name was Joseph Tanner, his grandfather being an Englishman of that name.
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Iron Shield’s Fall

The following is an excerpt from Indian Tales of the Canadian Prairies (1894) by James F. Sanderson. Iron Shield's Fall One of the most gallant and successful stands ever made by a band of Indian warriors against overwhelming numbers, was made by five Cree braves, a little over twenty years ago, on
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O-kish-che-ta-wak

The following is an excerpt from Indian Tales of the Canadian Prairies by James Francis Sanderson. O-kish-che-ta-wak There was a large band of Blackfoot encamped on the plain of Medicine Hat. This was a favored resort of the Blackfoot in the spring and summer and, at the time I speak of, the
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How Seven Persons Creek was Named

The following is an excerpt from Indian Tales of the Canadian Prairies (1894) by James F. Sanderson. How Seven Persons Creek was Named Long, long ago- it would be useless to attempt to find out how many years ago- a party of Blackfoot when out on the war path, had occasion to
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How Medicine Hat was Named

The following is an excerpt from Indian Tales of the Canadian Prairies (1894) by James Francis Sanderson. How Medicine Hat was Named There is a certain part of the South Saskatchewan River about a mile and a half from Medicine Hat, on which, even during the most severe winters, no ice forms.
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The Prediction

The following is an excerpt from Indian Tales of the Canadian Prairies (1894), by James F. Sanderson. The Prediction There were two noted chiefs of the Crees who were brothers-in-law. One was named Eh-kaka-putta-what, or The Man who didn’t Miss, and the other Pas-ki-si-ka-nis, or Little Gun. The latter was not only

The Sutherland Boys

The following is an excerpt from Indian Tales of the Canadian Prairies (1894), by James F. Sanderson. The Sutherland Boys Two of the finest young warriors the Crees ever had were two Scottish half-breeds, sons of a Highland Scot named Hugh Sutherland, a Hudson’s Bay Co. employee. One was called Oo-sa-us-tik-wan, or
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The Gros Ventres’ Raid

The following is an excerpt from Indian Tales of the Canadian Prairies (1894), by James F. Sanderson. The Gros Ventres' Raid It was about 1868 when a terrible battle took place in the Medicine Hat district, between a party of Gros Ventres and a strong body of Blackfoot. The Medicine Hat vicinity
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Red Ochre Hill

The following is an excerpt from Indian Tales of the Canadian Prairies (1894), by James Francis Sanderson. Red Ochre Hill About 26 years ago, as near as I can come to the date in my reckoning, a party of Crees and Saulteaux numbering 900 lodges, were camped at a place 40 miles

Kin-u-sayo’s Death

The following is an excerpt from Indian Tales of the Canadian Prairies (1894), by James F. Sanderson.Kin-u-sayo’s Death Some years ago, how many I cannot exactly say, a war party of thirteen Cree braves, led by Pish-eesh, or Little Link, a Saulteaux Indian and a noted chief, came on a foray